Tag Archives: Kickstarter

Under The Dog Receives Kojima Endorsement

Anime Kickstarter project out of Japan, Under The Dog, has received a boost towards its goal of $580,000. Hideo Kojima of Metal Gear fame has thrown his support behind the project with the following quote:

“Coming with the permeation of the internet [in our daily lives], “creating” and a production’s “financing” structure have changed significantly.

Now, new methods of “creating” are being put to the test, where direct communication between the creator and the global user has become the norm and the creator is not bound by the former traditional investor or clientele. In such circumstances right now, a writer with remarkable talent, Jiro Ishii, who brought to the world numerous renowned adventure games during his “salary man” days, has now taken up the torch in order to challenge the traditions and establish this new future of “creating.” This is “Under the Dog,” the crowdfunding effort for an indie anime based on Jiro Ishii’s original story.

One cannot help but pay close attention to this project. One cannot help but cheer on this project. In particular, how can this creator who garners cult-like popularity catalyze a new chemical reaction [in the industry] by putting an emphasis on “creating,” which stands apart from the typical commercial oriented projects? One cannot help but look forward to this succeeding.

Jiro Ishii’s indie challenge will not only change the path for “creating,” but at the same time declare the answer for the question: Can game designers be accepted by the world as storytellers in [other mediums] as well?”

As of writing, Under The Dog has raised $616,732 of its $580,000 goal which is amazing and means this amazing 24 minute anime will go into production. If you’ve come to the party late and aren’t up to speed with this exciting project with some amazing names behind it, I’ve included a trailer along with some information on the people behind it and some amazing artwork.

Under The Dog poster

Masahiro Ando

Yusuke Kozaki

Hiroaki Yura

Jiro Ishii

Kinema Citrus

Orange Co

Anthea

Anthea2

Anthea3

Mighty No. 9 breaks through stretch goals

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you would have no doubt heard about Keiji Inafune’s Mighty No. 9 Kickstarter project. The awesome news is that the project received the full funding and went beyond expectations.

It was so successful that all the additional stretch goals were also cleared. What this means is that the highly anticipated game, a spiritual successor to Mega Man, will now be coming to numerous home platforms. By clearing through $4million, the game will be seen on the Xbox One, PS4, 3DS, Vita along with the existing plans to bring it to PC and now Mac as well as Linux.

mighty9 stretch goals

Project Phoenix director mentions Nintendo “Interesting…Not Exciting”

Project Phoenix marks Japan’s first indie Kickstarter project which reached its initial funding of $100,000 in just under 8 hours which is an impressive feat. The project features some of the best AAA talent from Western and Asian gaming with Hiroaki Yura spearheading the title as Director and Producer and Final Fantasy composer, Nobuo Uematsu, on board just to name a couple of the talent on board. Hiroaki is the man who created the Eminence Symphony Orchestra, responsible for many game and anime soundtracks and also the Director of Creative Intelligence Arts, or CIA.

Hiroaki has recently gone on record regarding Project Phoenix and the possibility of the title making an appearance on a Nintendo console when the game is completed in 2015. Specifically speaking, while Yura san is a fan of Nintendo, he doesn’t believe that Nintendo of Japan look towards indie developers as far in supporting their titles on Nintendo hardware.

The problem with Nintendo… You know, I like Nintendo and everything…but not a lot of people buy it. I know a lot of fans buy it, but there are so many restrictions with Nintendo, and also the fact that Nintendo in Japan does not accept indie games.

We think Nintendo is taking a wrong approach towards games like ours. I think maybe it has to do with the Kyoto culture…very old companies. Nintendo itself in Kyoto is not that old, because in Kyoto there are companies that survived for hundreds of years, and compared to them they’re relatively young, but in terms of video game industry they are very old. They have a set of rules that does not fit with the core values of our game, basically.

They have interesting hardware, but it ends at “interesting”. It’s not “exciting”.